Durasteel

Durasteel

Promat DURASTEEL® provides proven solutions to meet stringent building construction requirements.

Passive fire protection systems ranging from 60 minutes up to 4 hours with impact and blast resistance.

Comprehensive Technical Data Sheets, Safety Data Sheets and Application Guides to assist decision making and installation.

Fully tested and certified by third parties meeting and exceeding UK and EU regulations.

Partitions and Barriers

Partitions and Barriers

* External walls  *Single skin barriers  *Metal framed partitions

Promat provides a range of products for the fire protection of partitions and barriers, including DURASTEEL®. The DURASTEEL® systems offer high dimensional stability with exceptional moisture resistance as well as being able to meet specified acoustic, wind load, impact and blast performance requirements.

The combination of properties makes DURASTEEL® partitions and barriers ideal for use in the most demanding application areas.  Provides 60-240 minutes fire resistance.

More information available in Chapter 5 of our  Fire Protection Handbook and Technical Data Sheets.

Partition Design Considerations

Depending upon its situation and function within a building, a wall may need to fulfil different requirements in the event of fire. Fire resisting walls used for partitioning buildings and enclosing compartments will be required to provide a barrier to the passage of fire from one side or the other or both sides. The wall must therefore be able to satisfy each of the relevant criteria (integrity, insulation and if the wall is load bearing - load bearing capacity) from either side for the prescribed period.

Factors for consideration when determining the correct specification to ensure a wall or partition will provide the required fire performance include:

  • Nature and thickness of facings
  • Studwork and fixings
  • Compartmentation at head of wall
  • Deflection
  • Partition length
  • Load bearing
  • Cavity insulation
  • Service penetrations
  • Light switches and electrical sockets
  • Fire doors and glazing
  • Protected zones
  • Concealed spaces

External Wall Design Considerations

The proximity of a building to the relevant (facing) boundary determines the probability of it being a danger to other buildings on adjoining sites or of it being  at risk from a neighbouring building on fire. Building Regulations (Document B) specify different fire resistance periods for external walls depending upon their distance from the relevant boundary.

Where the walls are required to provide fire resistance only from the inside, loadbearing capacity and integrity are required to be satisfied for the full period; whereas insulation is required for only 15 minutes (Scottish Building Regulations may require different periods of fire insulation). 

Satisfactory constructions will be very different from those required to maintain insulation for the full period and where fire resistance is required from either side.

The following points should be considered when determining the correct specification to ensure an external wall will provide the required fire performance:

  • Distance from the relevant boundary
  • External cladding
  • Structural steel
  • Single storey buildings
  • Cavity barriers
  • Thermal insulation
  • Impact resistance
  • Wind loading

Test Details: 

Partitions: non-load bearing partitions should normally be tested or assessed in accordance with BS 476: Part 22: 1987 for integrity and insulation when exposed to fire from either side.

Load bearing partitions (walls) should normally be tested or assessed in accordance with BS 476: Part 21: 1987 for loadbearing capacity, integrity and insulation.

External Walls: non-load bearing external walls should normally be tested or assessed in accordance with BS 476: Part 22: 1987 and are required to satisfy the failure criteria of integrity and insulation when exposed to fire from either side. In some instances there will be additional criteria concerning the heat radiation from the unexposed face of the walls.

 


 

Ceilings

Ceilings

* Ceilings  * Messanines * Protected Zones

Promat offers a range of products for ceiling applications including DURASTEEL®, which can be used to provide a horizontal fire barrier with added benefits of impact and blast resistance. System designs are tested and assessed for a variety of ceiling applications to meet the high demands of the modern construction environment.

The system design will be dependent on performance requirements but generally comprise DURASTEEL® panels secured to a framework of steel tees, angles or channels. This provides a horizontal fire rated barrier, resistant from fire from above or below. DURASTEEL®’s high strength allows light loads such as maintenance traffic and is resistant to impact and high pressure hose streams during fire. Provides 60-240 minutes fire resistance.

More information available in Chapter 4 of our  Fire Protection Handbook and Technical Data Sheets.

Floor Design Considerations

Floors should normally be tested or assessed in accordance with BS 476: Part 21: 1987 and are required to satisfy the three failure criteria of loadbearing capacity, integrity and insulation when exposed to fire from below.

Loadbearing concrete floors supported by steel beams and protected with a suspended ceiling should be tested or assessed to BS 476: Part 23: 1987.

The following points should be considered when determining the correct specification to ensure a timber floor will provide the required fire performance:

  • Timber joist width
  • Timber joist depth
  • Timber joist spacing
  • Timber flooring
  • Suspended ceilings
  • Light fittings
  • Service penetrations
  • Cavity barriers
  • Engineered timber joists
 
The following points should be considered when determining the correct specification to ensure a concrete floor slab will provide the required fire performance:

  • Concrete density
  • Concrete moisture content
  • Concrete thickness and cover to reinforcing bars
  • Supporting steelwork
  • Light fittings
  • Service penetrations
  • Cavity barriers
  • Type of fire exposure
  • Concealed grid suspended and membrane ceilings
 

Roof Design Considerations

The key area for consideration is that there are no gaps left at the junction between the wall, any structural member and the external cladding, that will result in compartmentation to be breached and allow the passage of fire.

The same level of fire resistance at the junction should be provided as the level for the compartment wall.

Consideration must be made to possible gaps forming because of deformation of any structural element and/or the external cladding.

Protected Zone Design Considerations

If a fire breaks out near the area where a compartment wall meets a roof, there is a risk that it will spread over the roof to the adjoining compartment. To reduce the risk, Building Regulations (Document B) requires protection to be installed to a protected zone of the roof 1500mm either side of the compartment wall. However, for more onerous circumstances, the FPA Design Guide suggests a minimum of 2500mm, or up to 5000mm dependent upon the orientation of the ridge and the presence of a sprinkler system

The FPA Design Guide is a document aimed at protecting businesses against disruption and loss of critical stock and machinery due to fire. Within the document there is information on extent of the zone, fire ratings expected by insurers and the industry as a whole.

Fire Rated Ductwork

Fire Rated Ductwork

* Service enclosures *Protected shafts *Smoke/ventiation ducts *Gas pipes *Kitchen extract ducts *Cable protection

Promat provides a range of options for fire rated ductwork, including DURADUCT®, which comprised of DURASTEEL®, offers high levels of blast and fire resistance. DURADUCT® is ideal for particularly onerous conditions e.g. where high impact strength is required or for use in aggressive environments.  

Prvodies 30-240 minutes fire resistance.

More information available in Chapter 6 of our  Fire Protection Handbook and Technical Data Sheets.

Ducts Design Considerations

The relative complexity of any ductwork system which is passing through different fire compartments and the relevance of the system’s function in ambient and fire conditions can make the selection of a suitable ductwork system difficult.

To determine the fire resistance of ducts (without the aid of fire dampers) passing through or between compartments, the system should normally be tested or assessed in accordance with BS 476: Part 24: 1987.

Factors for consideration when determining the correct specification to ensure ducts will provide the required fire performance include:

  • Required fire exposure
  • Required fire performance
  • Supporting structure
  • Hanger support
  • Steel ductwork
  • Penetrations through walls and floors
  • Ductwork functions
  • Acoustic performance
  • Thermal insulation
  • Water tolerance
  • Strength and appearance
  • Access requirements (hatches) for inspection

Cable Protection Design Considerations

In the event of a fire it may be vital to the safety of the building occupants that certain electrical systems and services remain functioning until all personnel have escaped. Such systems will therefore require protection from fire for a specified period of time.

The following points are some of the factors which should be considered when determining the correct specification to ensure the cable duct system will provide the required fire performance.

  • Required fire exposure
  • Required fire performance
  • Supporting structure
  • Penetrations through walls and floors
  • Acoustic performance
  • Thermal insulation
  • Water tolerance
  • Strength and appearance
  • Failure temperature of the cable
  • Maximum cable operating temperature

 


Test Details

Ducts: to determine the fire resistance of ducts (without the aid of fire dampers) passing through or between compartments, the system should normally be tested or assessed in accordance with BS 476: Part 24: 1987. This standard has been written specifically for ventilation ducts, but guidance is also given in the standard on the performance requirements for ‘smoke outlet’ ducts and ‘kitchen extract’ ducts.

For any size of duct, the tensile stress in the steel hangers must not exceed the maximum permitted stress for each fire resistance period based on BS 5950: Part 8: 2003. If these stress levels are exceeded then the size of the hanger rods must be increased, or the centres of the hangers reduced or the hangers protected. The penetration of the hanger fixings into any concrete soffit should be a minimum of 50mm for 120 minutes ratings or 65mm for 240 minutes ratings.

Service enclosures: for the provision of fire resisting constructions to general building services, 60 to 240 minutes fire rating (integrity with varying periods of insulation), in accordance with the performance criteria of BS 476: Part 20: 1987.

Chapter 6 of the Fire Protection Handbook includes further information.

 

Doors and Hatches

Doors and Hatches

Doors form an important component of many fire compartmentation systems.

Promat offers a full range of DURASTEEL® and DURASMOOTH® doors and hatches for fire and blast resistant applications. DURASTEEL® Panels can also be used for door upgrading.

DURASTEEL® Doors and Hatches can be installed as part of a wider DURASTEEL® fire protection system or as individual items within other constructions. DURASTEEL Doors provide additional protection being impact or blast resistant. DURASMOOTH® doors include a range of superior quality, smooth faced steel doors offering flexible configurations and performance.  60-240 minutes fire resistance.

Design Considerations

Building Regulations (Document B) gives strict guidance on the use of fire doors. In addition, documents such as the FPA Design Guide provides further guidance on applications and uses.

Factors for consideration when determining the correct specification to ensure a doorwill provide the required fire performance include:

  • Tested in conjunction with partitions
  • Impact
  • Security
  • Ironmongery

Test Details

All doors in this section are tested to BS 476: Part 22: 1987 and will also meet the relevant requirements of BS 5588 for fire resisting doorsets.

See our Fire Protection Handbook provides further infromtion.